home

Faculty

 
 
301-405-8765
email
lab website

Jonathan Beier

Assistant Professor

BPS 2147E

Research Summary : My research investigates the foundations of social cognition and social behavior, primarily through studies with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. In particular, my work focuses on the development of children's understanding of the social goals that motivate people's behaviors towards one another and the social relationships that may hold between individual people. These topics are closely related to many other key issues in social cognition, such as communication and prosocial motivations, as well as representations of intentional agency, social norms, and social categories. I employ a variety of behavioral methods, from looking time and eye-tracking methodologies to more active measures of children's helping and communicative behaviors. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, I received my PhD from Harvard University and then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

 
301 405 5862
email

Edward Bernat

Assistant Professor

BPS 3123E

Research Summary : Dr. Bernat's research focuses on brain mechanisms that underlie individual differences in cognitive and affective processing. This involves basic science work developing measures for critical mechanisms, and clinical-translational work assessing how these mechanisms relate to psychopathology and individual differences. Measures of psychopathology center on dimensional approaches, where a well-validated 2-factor model offers a parsimonious way to index core processes that span comorbid/co-occurring psychopathological problems (i.e. externalizing, including substance abuse and aggression, and internalizing, including anxiety and depression). Newly funded projects extend this work directly to clinical interventions, by investigating how these brain mechanisms change during substance dependence treatments in one project and anxiety/depression treatments in another. Physiological measures are focused on advanced EEG/MEG neuroimaging techniques in conjunction with measures of peripheral physiology (e.g. skin conductance, startle blink, heart rate, facial muscles, and eye tracking). New efforts are focused on the integration of these measurement domains with MRI/fMRI.

 

Jack J. Blanchard

Professor and Department Chair

BPS 1123L

Research Summary : Dr. Blanchard conducts research examining the psychopathology of schizophrenia and schizotypy. This research involves understanding the emotional, social, and neurocognitive changes associated with these disorders. Much of his research has focused on understanding how emotion is altered in schizophrenia and how individual differences in affective traits are related to other aspects of the disorder including social dysfunction, stress reactivity, and cognitive impairment. Related to this work on emotion, Dr. Blanchard's lab has sought to understand how decreased hedonic capacity might serve as an indicator of the genetic liability for schizophrenia. Another focus of his lab is the development of new assessment approaches for the measurement of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

 
301.405.5874
email
lab website

Steven E. Brauth

Professor

BPS 0283

Research Summary : My research is currently focused on auditory-vocal learning in parrots. Auditory-vocal learning is a fundamentally important learning process necessary for normal speech acqusition in humans. Auditory-vocal learning involves the ability to acquire communication sounds in a social context in reference to the communication sounds of external models. The term external models normally refers to members of the individual's species with whom the learner engages in important social interactions. In other words, species capable of auditory vocal learning are capable of imitating the sounds of other individuals or creating novel sounds shared with other individuals for the purposes of coordinating social or reproductive behavior. The specific research problems involve identifying brain areas which acquire, store and produce learned communication sounds and the physiological processes by which these behaviors are accomplished.

 

M. Colleen Byrne

Clinical Associate Professor and Psychology Clinic Director

BPS 2114

Research Summary : Dr. Byrne received her degree from Emory University in 1998. She completed her internship at the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa, Florida and pursued postdoctoral training with children and adolescents at the Beyond Words Center for Social Skills Training in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Byrne served as head of the child team at East Ridge Community Mental Health Center in Martinsburg, West Virginia. She joined the UMCP faculty as the Psychology Clinic Director in 2001. Since 2005, Dr. Byrne has served on the Executive Committee for the Association of Directors of Psychology Training Clinics (ADPTC). She provides pro bono services for the Give an Hour Foundation and the Pro Bono Counseling Project.

 
301-405-4973
email
lab website

Jude Cassidy

Professor

BPS 2147C

Research Summary : Jude Cassidy is professor of Psychology at the University of Maryland, and director of the Maryland Child and Family Development Laboratory. She received her Ph.D in 1986 from the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on attachment, social and emotional development in children and adolescents, social information-processing, peer relations, early intervention, and longitudinal prediction of adolescent risk behavior from earlier family interactions. Dr. Cassidy serves as co-Editor of the journal Attachment and Human Development, and along with Phillip Shaver, is the co-Editor of the Handbook of Attachment (2008). She is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, and received the Boyd R. McCandless Young Scientist Award from the American Psychological Association. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute on Drug Abuse.

 

Andrea M. Chronis-Tuscano

Associate Professor

BPS 1123K

Research Summary : Dr. Chronis-Tuscano's research focuses broadly on understanding early predictors of developmental outcomes for children with Attention- Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and developing novel treatments which target these early risk and protective factors. Much of this research has addressed issues related to maternal parenting and psychopathology (namely, maternal depression and ADHD). A secondary line of research, conducted in collaboration with faculty in Human Development, aims to examine the trajectory of young children displaying early behavioral inhibition, including the development of psychopathology, and to intervene by targeting key moderators of outcome (e.g., parenting and social relationships). Recent projects conducted by Dr. Chronis-Tuscanos research group include: (1) the development and evaluation of an integrated parenting program for depressed mothers of children with ADHD; (2) examination of early predictors of developmental outcomes in a large sample of preschool-aged children with and without ADHD; and (3) development and evaluation of a parent-child intervention for families of inhibited preschool-aged children. Dr. Chronis-Tuscano is the Associate Editor of the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology; on the APA Division 12 Presidential Task Force on Enhancing Graduate Training in Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology (link to come); and serves as the Scientific Advisor to the NIMH Outreach Partnership with the State of Maryland. She is the recipient of multiple NIH grants and has served on the NIMH Interventions Committee for Children and their Families. She is the 2013 recipient of the College of Behavioral & Social Sciences Teaching & Mentoring Award.

 

Andres De Los Reyes

Assistant Professor

BPS 3123H

Research Summary : Dr. De Los Reyes received his Ph.D. in 2008 from Yale University. He completed his training at the APA-accredited clinical internship at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Psychiatry, Institute for Juvenile Research. Dr. De Los Reyes is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Director of the Comprehensive Assessment and Intervention Program (CAIP) at the University of Maryland at College Park. His research seeks to understand why assessments of child and adolescent mental health often yield inconsistent conclusions. Commonly used informants of child and adolescent mental health, such as parents and teachers, often vary in where they observe children and adolescents, such as home and school settings. Thus, informants differ in their opportunities for observing child and adolescent mental health concerns. With an emphasis on assessments of adolescent social anxiety, Dr. De Los Reyes investigates how inconsistencies in mental health assessments reveal meaningful information about the contexts within which children and adolescents express mental health concerns. A key goal of this work is to enable researchers and practitioners to use inconsistencies in child and adolescent mental health assessments as key tools for understanding the etiology, classification, and treatment of child and adolescent mental health.

 
301.405.5925
email
lab website

Robert J. Dooling

Professor

BPS 2123D

Research Summary : Research in the Laboratory of Comparative Psychoacoustics is aimed at understanding how animals communicate with one another using sound and whether there are parallels with how humans communicate with one another using speech and language. Birds such as songbirds and parrots, like humans, rely on hearing and learning to develop a normal vocal repertoire. We often study budgerigars (parakeets), canaries, zebra finches, and other small birds. For instance, we have specific projects on vocal learning and vocal development in budgerigars, the regeneration of auditory hair cells and recovery of hearing and the vocalizations in small birds following hearing damage, and the effect of noise on hearing. Other studies focus on how small birds localize sounds, how they perceive complex sounds such as bird vocalizations and human speech, and how the bird ear functions.

 

Lea R. Dougherty

Assistant Professor

BPS 1123G

Research Summary : Dr. Doughertys research interests lie broadly in the examination of the etiology and course of depression from a developmental, life-span perspective. Within this domain, her research focuses on three areas: (1) an examination of the developmental origins of risk for depression, with a particular focus on early neuroendocrine functioning, individual differences in affect and temperament/personality, and examining associations between potential endophenotypes for depression and specific genotypes; (2) understanding the phenomenology of depression and mood dysregulation in preschoolers and establishing empirically-based assessment and treatment approaches for affective disorders in very young children; and (3) investigating the neural basis of emotion regulation and the effects of early experience and stress on brain development.

 
301.405.8423
email
lab website

Michael R. Dougherty

Professor and Associate Chair of Graduate Studies

BPS 1145C

Research Summary : My research consists of three interrelated strands. One strand examines the interplay between attention, memory, and judgment and decision making. We hypothesize that errors and biases in early attentional processes, and limitations in working memory capacity, can cascade into errors and biases in judgment and decision making processes. One important component of this strand is the development of a computational model of diagnostic hypothesis generation that allows us to examine how the processes of information acquisition and attentional limitations feed into the processes of hypothesis generation and judgment. A second strand examines the impact of cognitive plasticity training for improving cognitive functioning. Specifically, the goal of this research is to understand the core processes necessary for effective and efficient processing of information, to improve these processes through extensive cognitive training, and to apply this research to important domains such as quantitative reasoning, language comprehension, and academic achievement. A third strand of research focuses on the development and testing of psychometric measures of cognitive functioning and attitude. Specifically, we are developing novel measures of working memory capacity, and using these new measures to investigate the construct validity of existing measures of implicit attitude formation.

 

Julia Felton

Assistant Professor

BPS 1123M

Research Summary : My research focuses broadly on gender differences in developmental psychopathology. Specifically, I am interested in risk factors related to depression and substance use during adolescence and the role of stress and maladaptive coping styles in the development of these mental health disorders. I am also interested in longitudinal data modeling and related techniques. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, I received my PhD from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee and completed a clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, South Carolina. Currently, I serve as the Director of the MPS in Clinical Psychological Sciences Program.

 

Michele J. Gelfand

Professor

BPS 3147C

Research Summary : As a cross-cultural social organizational psychologist, my research focuses on three areas of investigation: a) Cultural influences on conflict, negotiation, trust, revenge, and forgiveness, particularly in the Middle East and East Asia; (b) The development of theory and methods in cross-cultural psychology, specifically individualism-collectivism, cultural tightness-looseness, fatalism, and honor; (c) Workplace diversity and gender dynamics in organizations, sexual harassment, and discrimination.

 
301.405.5909
email

Charles J. Gelso

Professor Emeritus

BPS 1123E

Research Summary : The focus of my theoretical and empirical research is the client-therapist relationship in psychotherapy of differing orientations. Within this broad area, I focus more specifically on the client-therapist working alliance, client transference, therapist countertransference, and what is termed the real or personal relationship between therapist and client. My research on work on the real relationship led to my most recent book, The Real Relationship in Psychotherapy: the Hidden Foundation of Change (2011, American Psychological Assoc.) and I am currently writing a book on the the therapeutic relationship in clinical practice. My current empirical research efforts focus on transference, countetransference and the real relationship in therapy of different orientations, both brief and longer-term treatment.

 
301 405 2877
email
lab website

Erica R. Glasper

Assistant Professor

BPS 2123N

Research Summary : How does experience change the structure of the brain? Are the functions of the brain mediated by changes in structural plasticity? Can rewarding experiences protect the aging brain? My laboratory aims to answer these and other related questions by investigating structural plasticity in the adult and aging brain, its alteration by experiences and hormones, with a view toward understanding their functional relevance. To do so, my research focuses on the interactions among rewarding experiences, hippocampal structural plasticity, and hippocampal function. My specific research interests include: (1) examining the interactions among age, rewarding experiences, and hippocampal structural plasticity and function, and (2) examining how paternal experience alters hippocampal structural plasticity and function in a biparental species, the California mouse. My laboratory focuses on adult neurogenesis; dendritic spine alterations; social, cognitive, and emotional behaviors, relying on many research tools from behavioral neuroscience, neuroendocrinology, and molecular and cellular biology.

 

William S. Hall

Emeritus Professor

Research Summary : During his career, Professor Hall has made contributions to two different but related fields in Psychological Science, developmental psycholinguistics and comparative neuroscience. His work in recent years in comparative neuroscience addressed a fundamental issue in Psychology and Biology: How do individuals who learn their communication sounds use the information in auditory stimuli to provide feedback for vocal learning? Using a small parrot (the Budgerigar) as a model system, he explored this question by mapping brain pathways interconnecting the auditory system with vocal control areas and other brain areas, employed the method of lesioning of putative pathways needed for providing auditory feedback to test hypotheses concerning the role of these pathways and, most recently used gene expression techniques to evaluate the responsiveness of neurons in the brain to species-typical sounds and other sounds.

 

Paul J. Hanges

Professor

BPS 1147C

Research Summary : Dr. Hanges research interests center on topics in (a) leadership and culture; (b) personnel selection, test fairness, and diversity; and (c) dynamical modeling, complexity theory, and research methodology. He was a co-Principal Investigator of the GLOBE project. GLOBE is a multi-phase, multi-method project in which investigators spanning the world worked together to examine the inter-relationships between societal culture, organizational culture, and organizational leadership. The project started in 1993 and over the years, approximately 170 social scientists and management scholars from throughout the world have joined the project. The fourth phase of this project is currently being planned. Dr. Hanges also has written articles and conducted research focused on personnel selection, test bias, and discrimination. He started the Adverse Impact Research Group along with Dr. Jim Outtz, an alumni of the Maryland program. This research group is a collaborative research effort to identify factors that reduce or eliminate adverse impact in human resources practices. Dr. Hanges has worked with organizations to develop fair and valid selection systems and has been retained as an expert witness on several court cases. Recently, he has been working with the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) to understand the role of organizational diversity on the health of the organization (for more information go to http://www.lib.umd.edu/ocda/). Finally, Dr. Hanges is interested in dynamical models and their applicability to changes in perceptions and other cognitive processes. The conceptual model driving this work is the information processing model known as connectionism. With the connectionist perspective, the focus is on activation patterns of information stored in memory and focusing on factors that may activate or inhibit the leadership pattern.

 

Jens Herberholz

Associate Professor

BPS 2123H

Research Summary : Research in my lab investigates the neural basis of animal behavior. We use crayfish and other invertebrates as our primary model systems because they display easily quantifiable behavioral patterns, and they feature a nervous system of tractable complexity that is accessible to a variety of experimental techniques. We combine behavioral, neurophysiological and in vivo neuroimaging studies to identify and investigate neural circuitry that controls aggression and social hierarchy formation, and to determine neural mechanisms underlying decision-making processes and behavioral choice. For more information, please refer to my website.

 
301.405.5791
email
lab website

Clara E. Hill

Professor

BPS 2147G

Research Summary : I am primarily interested in what makes psychotherapy work. Within this general topic, I focus on the skills therapists use to help clients, working directly with the therapeutic relationship, utilizing dreams to lead to greater insight and action, and training and supervising therapists to help them become more effective in their work with clients. In addition, I am very interested in discovering new and better ways to investigate psychotherapy, and have been working on developing qualitative methods that capture more of the inner experiences of participants in the psychotherapy process. To investigate psychotherapy more thoroughly and to train therapists, we have recently established the Maryland Psychotherapy Clinic and Research Lab.

 
301-405-5875
email

William Hodos

Distinguished University Professor Emeritus

BPS 2123C

Research Summary : The early part of my scientific career was devoted to the study of motivation in animals. In the 1970s, I developed an interest in the excellent vision of birds and how visual information is processed in the avian central nervous system. This led to a series of anatomical experiments to determine the central visual pathways in the nervous systems of birds and application of various behavioral psychophysical techniques to measure color vision, visual acuity, luminance differences, and spatial and temporal contrast sensitivity in pigeons, quail, hawks, owls, starlings, and other birds. I have also carried out a number of studies of the physiological optics of the eyes of various birds. In addition to my research, I have scholarly interests in the evolution of the brain and the evolution of behavior, comparative neuroanatomy, and animal intelligence. I became an emeritus professor in 2005 and closed my laboratory. I therefore am no longer actively involved in research nor am I accepting new graduate students. I do, however, remain active in the teaching programs of the Psychology Department and the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science program

 

Derek Iwamoto

Assistant Professor

Biology Psychology Building 2147K

Research Summary : Broadly, the aim of Dr.Iwamoto's research is to address health disparities experienced by traditionally underserved and understudied groups including African Americans and Asian Americans by 1) identifying socio-cultural determinants and mechanisms that influence the developmental trajectories of substance use and mental health problems, and 2) conducting translational research to inform and augment substance abuse treatment and interventions targeting at-risk ethnic and racial minority adolescents and young adults. To date, his work has contributed to the literature by examining the influence of socio-cultural factors such racial socialization (i.e., racial consciousness, racial/ethnic group attachment) and gender socialization or the beliefs, attitudes and expectations of what it means to be a man or woman (adherence to masculine and feminine norms), on alcohol/substance abuse and mental health problems among ethnically diverse populations. Dr.Iwamoto recently edited the first ever book on counseling interventions with Asian American men.

 

Arie W. Kruglanski

Distinguished University Professor

BPS 3147

Research Summary : My research concerns the formation of attitudes and beliefs as they are impacted by cognitive and motivational variables. From this perspective I have been carrying out research in the domains of social cognition, the psychology of goals and goal pursuit, persuasion, and social judgment processes, group formation, intergroup relations, terrorism and the psychology of culture.

 

Edward LeMay

Associate Professor

BPS 3145

Research Summary : My research focuses on three primary areas: a) The role of motivated cognition within interpersonal relationships, especially effects of motivation on trust-related cognitions; b) Processes that contribute to the maintenance or deterioration of interpersonal relationships; and c) The interplay between interpersonal relationships and individuals' psychological and physical health, especially dyadic phenomena in which individuals are influenced by each other. I also have interests in measurement, behavioral observation methods, and statistical analysis of dyadic and prospective data. \

 

Carl Lejuez

Professor, Director of the Clinical Program, Director, Center for Addictions, Personality, and Emotion Research (CAPER)

BPS 1123C

Research Summary : Dr. Lejuez's current clinical and research interests focus on the development of ecologically valid laboratory analogues of addiction and their use to better understand the active ingredients of treatment (i.e., translational research). His most recent projects involve (1) the creation and validation of a behavioral task to predict adolescent risk-taking behaviors (e.g., drug use, unsafe sexual practices); (2) the examination of factors underlying addictions treatment failure (e.g., low distress tolerance); (3) the development of novel treatments of co-morbid depression and anxiety among substance users with behavioral activation strategies; (4) factors underlying drug choice differences (e.g., crack/cocaine vs. heroin) among inner-city substance users; and (5) mechanisms underlying AXIS II Personality Disorders (primarily Borderline PD and Antisocial PD), with a focus on inner-city substance using samples.

 

Laura MacPherson

Associate Professor

Cole Field House 2103E

Research Summary : Research Summary : Dr. MacPhersons clinical and research interests include a developmentally-informed examination of the progression and cessation of addictive behaviors among adolescents and young adults to improve youth-tailored interventions, as well as developing behavioral treatments for adult smokers with psychiatric comorbidities. Current projects and interests include: 1) developing and testing behavioral activation-based cessation interventions for adult and adolescent smokers with co-occurring psychopathology with a focus on reward processing mechanisms underlying treatment effects, 2) identifying trajectories of appetitive (e.g., risk taking propensity) and avoidant (e.g., distress tolerance) reinforcement based processes as they relate to changes in adolescent substance use and risk behaviors over time, and 3) developing behavioral assessments of negative reinforcement-based risk taking among youth.

 
301-405-5907
email

Jonathan Mohr

Assistant Professor

BPS 2147K

Research Summary : I study manifestations and consequences of stigma, discrimination, and stereotypes in everyday life, particularly with respect to lesbian, gay, and bisexual people. Some of my work is on the experiences  both positive and negative  of individuals from stigmatized groups, whereas some is on attitudes and behaviors toward members of stigmatized groups. I have a secondary research program on interpersonal relationships, with an emphasis on romantic relationships and the psychotherapy relationship. These two lines of scholarship intersect in my writing on same-sex couples and psychotherapy with sexual minority clients. My work is based on theoretical perspectives from social and personality psychology, including attachment theory, minority stress theory, and theories of collective identity formation.

 

Cynthia F. Moss

Professor

BPS 2123M

Research Summary : Echolocating bats produce ultrasonic vocalizations and process information carried by returning echoes to build a three-dimensional representation of the world using sound. They dynamically modify the features of their sonar signals in response to echoes from objects in the environment, and in my lab we take advantage of the specialized behaviors of bats to study perception, its neurobiological foundations, and the use of spatial information to guide action and memory of places. Using echolocation, bats can successfully maneuver rapidly through narrow spaces, which also requires agile flight control. Bats have fine hairs on their wings that are responsive to the air flow they experience in flight, and we are also studying the role of tactile signalling in adaptive flight behavior. Research methods in my lab include high speed 3-D infrared video tracking and synchronized microphone array recordings of free-flying echolocating bats along with neural recordings from behaving bats engaged in perceptual and spatial tasks.

 

Kent L. Norman

Associate Professor

BPS 3123F

Research Summary : His research is on human/computer interaction and cognitive issues in interface design. He has two online books, The Psychology of Menu Selection: Designing Cognitive Control at the Human/Computer Interface (1991, http://lap.umd.edu/poms) and The Switched On Classroom (1999, http://lap.umd.edu/soc). He is the developer of HyperCourseware", a Web-based prototype for electronic educational environments and is a co-author of the QUIS: The Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction, licensed by the University to corporate and government usability labs. His latest book is Cyberpsychology: An introduction to the psychology of the human/computer interface (2008) published by Cambridge University Press. On the humorous side, Dr. Norman does research on "Computer Rage" and has appeared on the Kojo Nnamdi Show, Good Morning America and numerous talk shows and in news articles on this topic (http://computer-rage.org)

 

Karen M. O'Brien

Professor

BPS 2147D

Research Summary : Counseling psychologists have a rich tradition of advancing scholarly knowledge and providing services to healthy individuals in times of crisis or transition (Gelso & Fretz, 2000). As scientist-practitioners and as psychologists, we are invited to use our knowledge to better the lives of individuals and contribute to the improvement of our society (American Psychological Association, 2003). Through my research, teaching, and service, I strive to generate knowledge that can be used to address social concerns and individual problems, to educate students to achieve their research and clinical potential, and to actively contribute to the communities in which I live and work. I have two areas in which I seek to advance knowledge in counseling psychology. The primary focus of my research program is to further understanding regarding the circumscription of women in low status, low paid occupations. Recently, I have begun to investigate factors related to healthy functioning in adoptive families.

 

Kevin E. O'Grady

Associate Professor, Retired

BPS 3147F

Research Summary : My quantitative research interests focus on three specific areas: 1) psychometric theory, particularly the strengths and weaknesses of classical true-score theory for the measurement and assessment of individual differences; 2) The design and analysis of controlled clinical trials, and the use of the generalized linear mixed model in the analysis of such designs; and, 3) latent variable modeling, and in particular, the utility and limitations of latent variable growth curve and latent class growth mixture models in the assessment of change over time. My interests in substance abuse have focused on: 1) the etiology of such abuse, particularly those individual, familial, and social factors that place an individual at increased risk for the development of a drug-abusing lifestyle; 2) the development of conceptually-based prevention programs that seek to impact at-risk individuals, where such programs are based on information about the risk factors of the individuals involved, that is, prevention and intervention programs that are directed by the risk-factor information available from the participants (rather than the development of broader-based prevention programs that attempt to cast a larger net); and, 3) the development of conceptual models that explain responsiveness to drug-abuse treatment for drug-abusing individuals, where such models utilize the results of baseline assessment information to explain differential responsiveness to treatment.

 

Luiz Pessoa

Professor

Research Summary : I employ behavioral and functional MRI methods to study cognition and emotion (as manipulated, for instance, via the threat of shock), with an emphasis on the interactions between cognitive and emotional brain systems. In a similar way, I also study interactions between cognition and motivation (as manipulated, for instance, via cash reward). An additional focus of my research centers on the development of statistical and computational tools for the analysis of fMRI data, particularly methods to link moment-to-moment fluctuations in behavior to single-trial brain responses.

 
301-405-2884
email
lab website

Elizabeth Redcay

Assistant Professor

Research Summary : My research examines the development and neural bases of communicative behaviors (e.g. joint attention, theory of mind, social interaction, language) and the interactions between these processes in both typical individuals and individuals with autism (a developmental disorder characterized by atypical communication). I ask how and the extent to which the brain systems underlying these behaviors become specialized and how this neural specialization is reflected in behavioral changes. To examine these questions, I use neuroimaging and behavioral methods with infants, children, adolescents and adults. In some of this research, I use paradigms in which participants engage in a real-time face-to-face communication during fMRI data acquisition, allowing for a more naturalistic social-communicative interaction.

 
301.405.5905
email
lab website

Tracy Riggins

Assistant professor

BPS 2147J

Research Summary : Tracy Riggins (Assistant Professor) received her Ph.D. in Child Psychology from the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota in 2005. Her graduate research focused on the development of declarative memory in the first decade of life using both behavioral and electrophysiological techniques (event-related potentials, ERPs). Dr. Riggins then completed two postdoctoral training fellowships at the University of California, Davis and University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. During these fellowships she extended her methodological training to include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. She had the opportunity to work with both typically developing children and adolescents as well as children with chromosomal abnormalities and children exposed to drugs prenatally. The research projects in Dr. Riggins's lab at College Park investigate the neural bases of cognitive development in both typically developing children and children with neurodevelopmental disorders using both behavioral and neuroimaging techniques (both event-related potentials, ERPs and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, MRI).

 

Matthew R. Roesch

Associate Professor

Research Summary : My laboratory studies the neural mechanisms of cognition, and their disturbance in disorders such as addiction and schizophrenia. Specifically, we are interested in the neural underpinnings of reward, learning, motivation, conflict and attention. Current research in my lab seeks to address the following question: How does the brain guide decisions based on expected outcomes and violations in those expectations? We address these issues with a variety of approaches in behaving rats, including neurophysiology, pharmacology, lesions and drug self-administration.

 
858-488-7594
email

Benjamin Schneider

Emeritus Professor

1363 Caminito Floreo, Suite G

Research Summary : For many years, Ben was the head of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology program at Maryland. He is presently Senior Research Fellow, CEB Valtera, and Professor Emeritus at Maryland. Ben has also taught at Michigan State University and Yale University and, for shorter periods of time, at Bar-Ilan University, Israel, on a Fulbright; University of Aix-Marseilles (France); Peking University (PRC); and in the Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College. Ben holds the PhD in psychology (University of Maryland, 1967) and the MBA (C.U.N.Y., 1964). His academic accomplishments include more than 150 professional journal articles and book chapters, as well as 12 books. Ben's interests concern service quality, organizational climate and culture, staffing issues, and the role of manager personality in organizational life. Ben was awarded the Year 2000 Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the 2006 Career Contributions to the Service Discipline Award from the Services Marketing Special Interest Group (SERVSIG) of the American Marketing Association, the 2009 Michael R. Losey Award from the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) for career contributions to Human Resources, the 2009 Herbert J. Heneman Jr. Career Contributions Award from the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management, and the 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management. In addition to his academic work, Ben over the years has consulted with numerous companies, recently including Allstate, Eli Lilly, State Farm, and INGAA.

 
301.405.9842
email
lab website

Alex Shackman

Assistant Professor

BPS3123G

Research Summary : Anxiety disorders are a leading source of human suffering. These disorders first emerge early in life, are extremely common, and are often resist treatment. Individuals with an anxious temperament -- those who express anxiety too intensely or in inappropriate contexts -- are much more likely to develop anxiety and other psychiatric disorders. To understand the substrates of this risk, we use a broad spectrum of tools, including brain imaging (e.g., fMRI) and event-related potential (ERP) techniques, peripheral physiological measures, and behavioral assays, such as experience sampling. Our laboratory is particularly focused on characterizing the mechanisms by which anxiety alters the processing of threats and punishments in a way that enhances the likelihood of avoidance and behavioral inhibition. Clinically, our work promises to enhance our understanding of how emotional traits and states modulate risk, facilitate the discovery of novel endophenotypes and biomarkers, and set the stage for developing improved interventions. From a basic psychological science perspective, our research begins to address fundamental questions about the nature of personality and the interplay of emotion and cognition.

 
301.405.0424
email

Harold Sigall

Emeritus Professor

BPS 3123E

Research Summary : My research explores various aspects of self-presentation, including the perceived morality of self-presentation, the goals of self-presentation, the unintended consequences of self-presentation, and self-presentational considerations in research measures. A related research interest I have is interpersonal relations. I also conduct research in certain problems related to stereotypes and stereotyping, including measurement of stereotypes and positive stereotypes. Final I have some interest in reactance theory.

 
301.405.5835
email
lab website

L. Robert Slevc

Assistant Professor

BPS 1145A

Research Summary : I study the cognitive mechanisms underlying language processing (especially language production) in both normal and brain-damaged populations. One line of research investigates how systems such as memory and cognitive control underlie our impressive ability to translate ideas into sentences. A related interest is the extent to which this translation of ideas into speech is based on knowledge of our audience versus on a need to reduce our own cognitive demands. In a second line of research, I investigate similarities between the processing of language and of music. This includes work on whether language and music rely on similar (or even the same) processing mechanisms and also research on the relationship of musical ability to successful second language acquisition.

 
(301) 405-5860
email

Barry D. Smith

Professor Emeritus

BPS 1123D

Research Summary : Dr. Smith's laboratory focuses on the biological bases of personality and emotion. His research is based on an evolutionary approach to understanding the role of arousal in personality, emotion, and behavior. Arousal, processed and integrated in a number of neural systems, interconnected by neural networks, affects body systems that can be assessed using psychophysiological measures. Current research focuses on cardiovascular reactivity. Additional measures include EEG, electrodermal activity, and facial electromyography, among others. Current and recent studies have examined arousal aspects of smoking, the menstrual cycle, social support, PTSD, anxiety, and caffeine consumption. Dr. Smith currently teaches doctoral seminars in personality and psychopharmacology. Other teaching interests include adult psychopathology and research design.

 

Charles Stangor

Professor

BPS 1123C

Research Summary : Charles Stangor is professor of psychology in the social psychology area at the University of Maryland, and has also taught at the University of Tübingen in Germany. He received his B.A. from Beloit College in 1973, and his Ph.D. from New York University in 1986. Dr. Stangor is the recipient of research grants from the National Institute of Mental Health and from the National Science Foundation. He has published 7 books and over 50 research articles and book chapters, and has served as an associate editor of the European Journal of Social Psychology. Dr. Stangor's research interests concern the development of stereotypes and prejudice, and their influences upon individuals who are potential victims of discrimination. He is a charter fellow of the American Psychological Society, and has served as the chair of the executive committee of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology. Dr. Stangor regularly teaches Social Psychology (Psyc 221), Research Methods (Psyc 420) and, at the graduate level, Group Processes (Psyc 742). Dr. Stangor has also won a distinguished teaching award from the University of Maryland.

 

Robert M. Steinman

Emeritus Professor

Research Summary : Robert M. Steinman devoted most of his scientific career, which began in 1964, to Sensory and Perceptual Process until his retirement in 2008. Most of his publications were concerned with human eye movements. Prof. Steinman has been collaborating with Prof. Pizlo in studies of shape perception since 2000.

 
301.405.5899
email

Forrest B. Tyler

Emeritus Professor

BPS 1123A

Research Summary : My current research focus is on the development and evaluation of prosocial community development projects. For the past several decades I have functioned primarily as a consultant to individuals and institutions actively creating and evaluating prosocial community approaches focused primarily on marginalized populations. A central aspect of this work has been in South America, India, New Zealand, and Jordan with homeless children and the disadvantaged children of marginalized families and/or families marginalized by their indigenous status. This research has been summarized in two books: Tyler, F. B. (2001). Cultures, Communities, Competence, and Change. New York: Kluwer/Plenum and Tyler, F. B. (2007). Developing Prosocial Communities across Cultures. New York: Springer.

 
301 405 8462

Aditi Vijay

Clinical Assistant Professor

BPS1145B

Research Summary : My research focuses broadly on the role of emotion regulation in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. Specifically, I am interested in individuals who develop post traumatic stress disorder. Recent projects have examined the role of emotion regulation in risk perception deficits in sexual assault survivors. A related line of research focuses on adaptations of Dialectical Behavior Therapy, for sexual assault the psychological correlates of interpersonal violence (e.g. sexual assault, intimate partner violence) and risk for retraumatization. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, I received my PhD from the University of Nevada, Reno, and completed my clinical internship at the VA Maryland Health Care System. Currently, I am an assistant professor in the MPS in Clinical Psychological Science program.

 

Thomas S. Wallsten

Professor Emeritus

BPS 3123D

Research Summary : As a cognitive psychologist with a penchant for formal models, Dr.Wallstens long-standing research interests are in behavioral decision theory, including the areas of judgment, choice, probabilistic inference, and measurement and communication of opinion. His teaching interests are in these areas, as well as in cognitive and mathematical psychology.

 
301-405-7228
email
lab website

David D. Yager

Associate Professor

BPS 2123G

Research Summary : My lab studies the evolution of auditory systems. We use the praying mantis because of its unique cyclopean auditory system that is linked to a strong, complex, stereotyped evasive response. A particular focus is on how the CNS changes during the evolution of a sensory system to use new sensory information to control adaptive behaviors. We combine neurophysiological and behavioral experiments with a broadly comparative approach

 
301.405.7724
email

Richard Yi

Research Associate Professor

Cole Activites Center 2103G

Research Summary : Research Summary: I employ a behavioral economic framework to examine decision-making processes underlying addiction and related behaviors. My research in this domain focuses on valuation of delayed outcomes (temporal discounting) and dynamic inconsistency as principal factors in substance use, abuse, and relapse. More generally, I am interested in maladaptive decision-making broadly defined. Other areas of interest include: the overlap between self-controlled and altruistic decisions; impulsivity and risk-taking as adaptive processes; learning- and cognition-based approaches to improve delay of gratification.